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 Post subject: Butternut?
PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:18 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2014 10:26 pm
Posts: 2
First name: Ted
Last Name: Wilson
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I have some butternut collecting dust. Anyone ever use it for a top?


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 Post subject: Re: Butternut?
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 6:03 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:20 am
Posts: 2188
Some dulcimer makers like it for soundboards. In weight and stiffness it seems comparable to Engelmann (slightly heavier, slightly less stiff).

I'm building a guitar with a sassafras top. I've had good luck with it on dulcimers. It is slightly heavier, slightly harder, and slightly less stiff than butternut. I'm not looking for it to sound like spruce.


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 Post subject: Re: Butternut?
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 8:36 am 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Sun May 24, 2015 9:30 am
Posts: 1
First name: Dale
Last Name: Penrose
City: Webster Groves
State: Missouri
Zip/Postal Code: 63119
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Semi-pro
I have in the past. It had a nice sound, more like cedar than spruce.


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 Post subject: Re: Butternut?
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 11:28 am 
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Contributing Member
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Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 9:59 pm
Posts: 2824
First name: Dennis
Last Name: Kincheloe
City: Kansas City
State: MO
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Definitely can be used for tops, though I haven't done it myself yet. Here's one by Ken Casper a few years ago that I really like http://www.luthiersforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10101&t=36832

Do you have any interest in selling any of it? I'm always looking for super straight grained pieces for necks (3/4" thick quartersawn), and some lower grade for heels as well (at least 1" thick and preferably flatsawn, because I laminate two pieces vertically to make a heel block with the seam down the centerline).


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 Post subject: Re: Butternut?
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 1:59 pm 
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Contributing Member
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Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2014 12:10 pm
Posts: 62
First name: Braedyn
Last Name: Schultz
City: Calgary
State: Alberta
Zip/Postal Code: T2X 1N7
Country: Canada
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I know Bruce and Matt Petros use it for necks, and they've had great success with it. It looks fantastic too.

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Butternut?
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 3:45 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2005 12:50 pm
Posts: 3027
Location: United States
I use butternut for necks on domestic wood Classicals. It's a lot like cedro; less dense and stiff than mahogany. I have used it on steel strings in the past, but have moved away from it recently. It's also a goog wood for blocks and liners. I can't recall ever testing out the properties with a view toward using it as a top wood. Most hardwoods tend to be less stiff along the grain at a given density than softwoods, but there are exceptions, such as balsa. Also, I'm always on the lookout for good butternut, but I can't recall ever seeing any wide enough for a quartered two piece top.



These users thanked the author Alan Carruth for the post: Braedyn (Sun Nov 26, 2017 4:05 pm)
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