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 Post subject: back center backstripe
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 10:25 am 
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Cocobolo
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I am currently about to join a two piece wenge back. I intend to have a chevron backstripe installed. Any thoughts on whether I should sandwich it between the two edges or inlay it after the two pieces are joined? Thanks.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 11:59 am 
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Not sure it matters but I inlay mine.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:05 pm 
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I would inlay for two reasons.

There is no way of knowing how strong a chevron strip is. Once sandwiched in a back it it will definitely be the weak link.

Also, the strip will not be as thick as your back. That means you should put a fill strip in to make up the difference before the back reinforcement strip is put on. It seems like way to much work to me.

But, I'm sure some have done it with success.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:49 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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That type of back strip is usually inlaid into a routed channel. If you're going to sandwich something like that (assuming it's deep enough to do that) you'll certainly want to use a wide reinforcing cross grain strip inside. It need not be very thick, but it needs to be there.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 1:13 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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I inlay. I always try to break the joint in the off cuts to see where the weak points are. With bwb fiber purfling on either side of the Center strip it always breaks quite easily along the purfling.

With a solid wood center strip inlaid it’s tough to break. That what I usually do now.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 8:04 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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I use a sandwich for a center inlay in the headstock which can be 1/16 in thick or 1.5.-2mm thick . If the center veneer is thin hand rtr, 2 rabett planes , chisel, and glue. I have done it both ways on the back. I prefer to joint my thicker homemade center strip and glue it to the back . If I have a decorative commercial thin center strip I will use a hand rtr just slightly undersize the depth and width . Then I finesse it with a L and rt hand LN rabett plane. I like fish glue, fast tack and then scrape, sand , and finish. My back reinforcement has the grain running in the same direction as the back . This makes it easy to achieve a 15 ft radius. The cross grain spruce IMHO is a traditional holdover from HHG days when back joints could come apart.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 8:36 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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I have done it both ways - sandwiched between or inlayed. Sandwiching allows you to "grow" the back and build a slightly larger instrument from narrower wood. Between the back strip and wide bindings and purflings you can sometimes "grow" the back as much as 1/2 an inch. When I sandwich it I glue a filler strip behind it so the delicate back strip is supported on a piece of wood that moves in the same fashion as the back.
Inlaying it is less work, and if the back is wide enough for what I am building I usually do that.
In -ALL - cases I use a cross grain spruce (or mahogany) strip across the back seam, whether it has a back strip or not. I know some modern builders don't but I think it adds a lot of strength to the joint with no sonic penalty.


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