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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:31 am 
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Koa
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Joined: Mon Dec 18, 2006 9:42 am
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Location: United States
My battery Black and Decker seems not to have enough power anymore to drive deck screws. I guess it needs a new battery, but it almost seems wiser to just buy a whole new drill. Any recommendations?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:40 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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porter cable is my go to
24v

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These users thanked the author bluescreek for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:01 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:00 am 
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Whatever is in stock at your local Home Depot, Lowe's, Menards, etc., and for which you can buy a second battery. I love being able to just swap the batteries in the charger and keep working. Currently, I use a DeWalt, but it would not bother me a bit to switch to any other brand, as long as I could have that second battery ready to go when the other one is drained.



These users thanked the author doncaparker for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:01 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:30 am 
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Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
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Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
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For Lutherie my criteria is:

1). 1/2" chuck for the SM end pin reamer (pup installs, I do a lot of them)
2). two batteries
3). stable base so when it's sitting on my bench it's not easy to knock over and hit an instrument with it
4). No stinkin fl*sh light in the kit [headinwall] [headinwall] [headinwall]

I like PC too and have one at home but my Festool drill in the city shop is now 12 years old and still going strong. I've replaced the batteries and the charger that originally came with it was forward compatible to newer battery technology, that's something you don't see every day. Interestingly lots of our clients see my drill when in our shop and comment about how much Festool is considered very good stuff.

During the time that I've used this Festool drill commercially and nearly every day Dave has had to replace his drill three times making Festool not more expensive in the long run.

But you know what they say, in the long run, "in the long run we are all dead!" :D :( :roll: laughing6-hehe

J.M. Keynes



These users thanked the author Hesh for the post (total 2): JSDenvir (Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:01 pm) • wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:01 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:31 am 
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I've moved from DeWalt to Milwaukee for small power tools. IMO they are better quality.

Edit: I will agree with Hesh, if you have the extra money, that the Festools are very good quality.

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Last edited by SteveSmith on Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:19 am, edited 1 time in total.


These users thanked the author SteveSmith for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:01 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:27 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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Milwaukee...

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These users thanked the author Haans for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:45 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:35 am 
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For carpentry type stuff the I like the Milwaukees. Used to use DeWalt but I think the Milwaukee has outpaced them.

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These users thanked the author klooker for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:45 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:59 am 
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Koa
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14.4 volt lithium -- great power to weight ratio, Ryobi works for us we have several good ones rather than one great ($$$) one, convenient save lots of time -- I do not suffer from shop tool envy. Good warranty which we have never used.

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These users thanked the author kencierp for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:29 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:55 am 
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Koa
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Screws are best driven by impact drivers, which virtually eliminate cam-out and have much greater driving capability than drill drivers for the same voltage. I drove a couple deck's worth of screws before one of the guys in the shop pointed out I was using the wrong tool for the job. On the next Habitat job where we had some decking to lay, I borrowed his 12V impact driver and became a convert - his 12V Bosch would drive the same fasteners that my 18V drill driver would struggle to set. Impact drivers can also use any hex shank tool, so they double as drill drivers for most drilling tasks where bits are available.

We have found that the 12V impact driver/drill driver combo kits available for $100 - $200 (includes both tools, two batteries, and charger) give the ability to drive larger deck screws, while the 3/8" chuck on the drill driver will handle most drilling and reaming done in the shop. We have two sets of 12V compact tools (Bosch and Milwaukee) and one set of 18V tools (Milwaukee brushless) in current use, and consider the Milwaukee to be the standout. With the industry switch from brushed to brushless technology (brushless = longer battery life at same Ah and voltage rating & better motor control), high grade brushed tool sets from Bosch, Makita, and Milwaukee can be had factory reconditioned for $99.

https://www.cpomilwaukee.com/factory-reconditioned-milwaukee-2494-82-m12-12v-cordless-lithium-ion-3-8-in--drill-driver-and-impact-driver-combo-kit/milr2494-82,default,pd.html?ref=pla&zmam=31282435&zmas=47&zmac=731&zmap=milr2494-82&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIhqD116z11gIV2bbACh0YFAWVEAQYAiABEgINHfD_BwE

The primary differences between commercial grade tools like DeWalt, Milwaukee, Bosch, and Makita and 'value' brands like Ryobi and Skil (with the exception of their 77 family of worm drive saws) all seem to be related to usage spectrum...we'd likely go with Ryobi or Skil for a new drill driver for hobby use based on the cost being about 1/2 of the commercial drivers. For anything approaching commercial use, an all metal transmission seems like a good idea, as the plastic gearing in lower end tools seems to be where life-limiting design decisions are made.

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These users thanked the author Woodie G for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:28 am)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:26 pm 
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Cocobolo
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The Ridgid drills at Home Depot have a lifetime warranty including batteries if you register it when you buy it. The 18v Ridgid that I bought 11 years ago is the best drill I have ever owned in my life corded or not. Ridgid has replaced the batteries twice in that period. I haven’t had any other issues with that drill, but I have needed parts for a couple of my other Ridgid tools. Ridgid provided the parts with no hassles.



These users thanked the author bobgramann for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:57 pm)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:37 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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Over the years (as a full time cabinet maker) I've spent more on battery drills than any other type of tool. I've used Makita, deWalt, Porter Cable,Milwaukee, Bosch, Ridgid, And Ryobi drill drivers. The batteries always died before the drills gave out and to replace them cost as much as buying a whole new kit (those who bought new batteries sometimes then had the charger die on them).
I like the Makita stuff, but for the price prefer the Ryobi. With a battery drill it's not a long term relationship.
I like the smaller(12v+) lithium ion drills, with a clutch and a built in l.e.d. light (for working inside cabinets) if available. But I won't pay too much because I know it will need to be replaced in the not too distant future.
If you are working at a bench, a $20 corded drill will outwork and out last a battery drill.



These users thanked the author Clay S. for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:57 pm)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:20 pm 
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I really like my Hilti. It's put up with a lot over the past six years and keeps ticking like a clock. It feels good in the hand, too.


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These users thanked the author James Orr for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:56 pm)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:24 pm 
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Koa
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On the Bosch, the two 10.8V batteries included with the kit are still taking a good charge after 8 years, although we picked up two 12V replacements on sale for $60 total a couple years ago (the 10,8V and 12V both work in the drill driver and impact driver).

While too early to tell whether the Milwaukee 12V kit will be as durable, the Bosch kit (purchased in 2010) seems to be headed for at least a decade in service with the original batteries still soldiering on.

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These users thanked the author Woodie G for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:56 pm)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:43 pm 
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Koa
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I got a Milwaukee 18v brushless kit about a year ago...I love it and prefer it over the NiMh Makita set it replaced (yeah, no comparison as far as the batteries, but basic performance is quantifiable).

as has been noted, an impact driver is usually preferred for driving fasteners, though one must be VERY careful when dealing with brass as an impact drill will snap those in a heartbeat if you don't know what you're doing.

as far as kits in general: for whatever stupid reason they come with only 2 batteries (one for each component) and that can suck if you are using both frequently, so you should think about investing in a second battery. in the case of the Milwaukee set I got I was very fortunate that Hell Depot had a sale going on where you got an extra item free, and in my case I chose a 2 pack of 3 amp hour batteries...considering the general stuff I do with the drills I really like the 2 amp hour battery that the impact driver comes with as it is very light. the hammer drill really does a quick job in said mode and I'm very impressed with it.



These users thanked the author Mike_P for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:56 pm)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:58 pm 
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Cocobolo
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I have had great luck, and bang for the buck, with Hitachi reconditioned tools from BigSky tools. They sell a 12v drill and impact driver combo that is a great small size for most of my luthier tasks. It is powerful enough to use with an endpin reamer but light enough that you don't have to think about its balance. The impact driver has plenty of power for driving scews and the drill is just a handy size. I got the set almost 10'years ago and when the drill failed I picked up another drill, with two more batteries, for $40.00, which was well worth the price for just the batteries themselves. Plus the balance well on their batteries standing up but aren't so top heavy they crush things if they fall over.



These users thanked the author kjaffrey for the post: wbergman (Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:55 pm)
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:00 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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For occasional use HF has a cheapy 18 v drill with 1 battery for under $20 with a coupon . For hvy duty work a friend recommended ryobi 20v lithium ion with 2 batteries. Personaly I prefer a drill press. I have 2 makita 9 volt drills a skill 3.5 volt screwdriver drill an older panasonic 20 yrs old and a new B and decker firestorm. Plus abt 4 or 5 elec drills and air drills. if you have a compressor . Try to match your purchase of the drill for its intended use. For lots of screw driving the most powerful drill you can afford etc etc.



These users thanked the author ernie for the post: wbergman (Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:11 am)
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:47 am 
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Koa
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Milwaukee M12 with extended battery.

The M12 is nice and light and plenty powerful. Bigger drills are heavier and the extra power is not needed for this work. I've been using mine for years in my canoe shop, pretty much on a daily basis. Its awesome.. The extra life battery has the bigger base, too.

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These users thanked the author douglas ingram for the post (total 2): Haans (Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:13 am) • wbergman (Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:04 am)
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:12 am 
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Walnut
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I'm an electrician who uses his drill and driver every day, often for things that you should really be using a corded drill for. I have a Bosch set that has been around for 5 years or so that I really love. I don't think I would buy a different brand at this point. I've seen apprentices burn out Rigid and Milwaukee drills, and the Bosch replaced a Dewalt drill that I really didn't like all that much.



These users thanked the author talladam for the post: wbergman (Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:29 pm)
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