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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2012 4:27 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:47 pm
Posts: 2
First name: Paul
State: CA
Country: USA
Status: Amateur
Hello, new member here with two questions regarding a first kit build.

I’m not a total noob to wood working, soldering and reading schematics. I know a little bit about the basics of guitar setup but throw in something out of the ordinary and I’ll mess up for sure. I don’t improvise a tool’s use unless absolutely necessary; I believe if a special tool exists for a particular use, it exists for a reason.

I’m going to be working on an SG double neck kit. Why a double neck? I figure I get to learn by building two for the price of one and look like twice the idiot while doing it. Anyway, onto my questions.

The kit comes with a Tune-O-Matic bridge and tailpiece. I plan to make some face-grain basswood dowels to plug the tail piece holes and install a hook-type tailpiece, just so it looks like an "original". My question here is that I’ve had a hard time finding anyone that sells a hook-type tailpiece in the states. I did find and purchase both 6 and 12 string tailpieces from a distributor/seller based in England. Is there a reason why the limited to no availability of this type of tailpiece? Are they trying to tell me something?

It appears that on initial fit up that I’m going to have to do some neck fitting to the body. The angle that the fret board makes with the body looks like it’ll make the height at the bridge higher than the typical 1/2” at the bridge. What is the best way (not necessarily the fastest) to remove material from the neck mounting pad to get the desired neck angle?

Oh, I guess I should mention that I’m no musician by any stretch of the imagination. I can’t even play the guitar save for a few simple chord progressions (I do own two guitars, though). I did play the trumpet back in middle school. I find that building things is a nice detour to the routine day in, day out.....

Thanks a lot for the comments, answers and your patience.

-Paul


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2012 5:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 8:35 pm
Posts: 2297
Location: Austin, Texas
First name: Dan
Last Name: Smith
City: Round Rock
State: TX
Zip/Postal Code: 78681
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Hi Paul,
Welcome!
If the necks are screw-on, you can use shims. I've used thin veneer or a piece of tape.
If they are glue-in, you can carefully sand the neck heel for a different angle.
Try to make it flat. Or, you can try a plane or jointer.
I'd temporarily assemble the bridge to the body and do a mock-up to get the neck angle correct.
Is it a 6 x 12 string, or a 6 + bass?
Post some progress pictures.
I have not played in a long time - everyone says I play really well, but I think the cool guitar I made gives the impression that I'm playing well.
Dan

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2012 7:43 am 
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Koa
Koa
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Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 9:06 pm
Posts: 1996
Location: Hummelstown PA
First name: Brian
Last Name: Howard
City: Hummelstown
State: PA
Zip/Postal Code: 17036
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
Welcome Paul,
The neck angle is set up for a tune-o-matic type bridge and as you note would need adjusted for a Fender style bridge. The T-O-M bridge was and is the standard bridge on all SG's unless you got the vibrato tailpiece or bought an SG junior. The junior just used the stop bar with some ridges on top to give approximate intonation like the 53-55 Les Pauls and used the same neck angle. That said there is no reason you could not adjust the neck angle and use the bridge you want, however I would recommend perhaps since this is your first attempt at this that you assemble the kit as intended. I think you will find this quite challenging in its own right, especially being a double neck.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 5:26 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:47 pm
Posts: 2
First name: Paul
State: CA
Country: USA
Status: Amateur
Gentelmen,

Thank you very much for your replies, comments and advice. I will post progress photos. I just need to clear my garage of all the other half baked projects I have going on. My work bench is currently cluttered with yard equipment that strangely enough died on the same day.

The kit is an 12/6 string. all the routing and holes are drilled. I know better, but other than a finish, I would have to say it's a screw together and play it kind of kit.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:41 pm 
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Koa
Koa

Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2010 1:46 pm
Posts: 899
First name: Freeman
Last Name: Keller
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Even tho you are building a kit, let me suggest that you get a copy of Melvyn Hiscock's book. He deals with all the geometry issues of set necks, bolt on, and thru neck designs, and has lots of good information about finishing and wiring.

Please post some pictures when it is done, good luck and have fun


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