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PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 2:58 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 12:47 pm
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First name: Jay
Last Name: De Rocher
City: Bothell
State: Washington
Zip/Postal Code: 98021
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I don't have a table saw to use to cut the face of the headstock at a 15 degree angle from a neck billet so I came up with this jig that allows me to cut the angle accurately using my band saw and the cut is clean enough that only a little touch up with light scraping or sanding is needed before gluing on the headplate.

It's made it from two pieces of scrap wood, two threaded rods, two knobs, and a miter bar. The whole thing is 2' long. The bottom wood plate is 5/8" thick and 5 1/2" wide. I ran it through the thickness sander to get both sides flat and parallel. The top wood piece is 2" by 2 3/4" tall after running it through the thickness sander to true up the sides. It's glued flush to one edge of the lower plate. I ran the assembly through the jointer with the bottom plate against the fence and the side of the top piece over the jointer knives to get a ninety degree angle between the faces. An 18" miter bar is mounted to the underside of the base plate at a 15 degree angle to the side face of the top wood piece. I used the awesome power of math [:Y:] to lay out the 15 degree angle for the miter bar. The threaded rods with the knobs hold the miter bar to the wood assembly. There is a notch cut into the side face of the upper piece to accommodate the band saw blade before starting the cut.

To use, place the miter bar into the miter slot on the band saw from behind the blade and then slide the jig toward the blade until the blade is positioned in the notch in the side face of the jig. Clamp the jointed neck billet onto the jig so that the blade lines up with the cut line. Turn on the band saw and slide the jig+billet into the blade until the end of the headstock cut is reached.

I searched the forum to see if something like this is already here, but didn't find it if it is. I like this jig (fixture?) because it is trivial to set up and use, I get consistent accurate cuts with it, and the cut surface is almost good enough to use as is after the cut. Maybe this will be useful to someone else without a table saw.

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These users thanked the author J De Rocher for the post: pat macaluso (Sat Apr 09, 2016 4:59 pm)
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 6:55 am 
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Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
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Nice!!! Well done Jay!!!


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 6:10 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 8:35 pm
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Location: Austin, Texas
First name: Dan
Last Name: Smith
City: Round Rock
State: TX
Zip/Postal Code: 78681
Country: USA
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Status: Amateur
I like it Jay!
I have been using my table saw, but it just scares the heck out of me.
Dan

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 4:59 pm 
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Location: Seattle WA
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Nice, are you using your resaw blade?

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 5:20 pm 
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First name: Jay
Last Name: De Rocher
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No, it's a 1/4", 6 TPI blade. It has no problem cutting a 3" wide mahogany neck blank.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 6:59 pm 
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I don't doubt a 1/4" cuts fine. Seems like it wouldn't cut all that flat and straight as a resaw though. must be a great setup!

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 7:08 pm 
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Nice jig?

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 7:09 pm 
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...that was supposed to be an exclamation point!

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These users thanked the author sdsollod for the post: J De Rocher (Sat Apr 09, 2016 7:24 pm)
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 7:42 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 12:47 pm
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First name: Jay
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pat macaluso wrote:
I don't doubt a 1/4" cuts fine. Seems like it wouldn't cut all that flat and straight as a resaw though. must be a great setup!

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk


I think that the blade cuts flat and straight mainly because the jig motion is so tightly constrained by the miter bar which in this case fits the miter slot on the band saw just right with no free play. The combined surface areas of the bottom of the jig and the neck blank also make the clamped assembly sit solidly on the table. I think having the upper band saw guides positioned close to the wood also helps. I haven't seen any tendency for the blade to wander off the line. The last neck blank I cut came out basically dead flat and only needed some light sanding with a block to prep the surface for the headplate.



These users thanked the author J De Rocher for the post: pat macaluso (Sat Apr 09, 2016 9:08 pm)
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 9:35 pm 
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First name: Bob
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I use a very similar fixture for my bandsaw, and one for the tablesaw. Only difference is I used UHMW for the miter bar as it is what I had handy at the time.

Bob


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 9:29 am 
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First name: Ed
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Why did you use threaded rod and knobs instead of just screwing the bar, or a piece of wood, to the bottom of the jig? Here is a kerfed lining jig I made out of a piece of 3/4" plywood and a maple runner adjusted in width with a scraper. The runner was installed with a little Titebond and 2 screws, and is plenty rigid:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ruby1638/ ... 606115293/

I think that even a 1/4" blade will work fine if it is sharp and you move slowly.

Ed


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 2:51 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 12:47 pm
Posts: 993
First name: Jay
Last Name: De Rocher
City: Bothell
State: Washington
Zip/Postal Code: 98021
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I used the threaded rod because the miter bar has threaded holes that match the thread on the rod. I also wanted to have the option of removing the miter bar easily in case I want to change the angle later for some reason so the knobs and threaded rod work for that. Besides, the knobs were just sitting there in the drawer crying out to be used for something.

The maple runner is a good idea and it would be cheaper than the miter bar.


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