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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:42 am 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:33 am
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Location: Cape Verde

I have a yellowish stain on a lovely bear-claw European spruce top around the rosette.  I assume this is frompenetration of the superglue into the end grain.  Any clues as to how to remove it?  I saw on one forum that soem people recommend washing the whole top with superglue but would that reproduce the yellowish hue? Has anyone tried adding dyes to the shellac for french polishing? Is this a possible approach and if so, what kind of dye should be used.


Bernie



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:57 am 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 2:21 am
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Location: Changes when ever I move..Australia
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Hi Bernie,

Welcome to the OLF

Not much you can do to remove CA from spruce I'm afraid and I think your on the right track in seeking a way to try and mask it. As for stains in shellac, I will let someone else more experienced to tackle but one think to keep in mind for the next one is to always seal the rosette rebate or any other end-grain on spruce with shellac to stop the CA from wicking in.

Cheers

Kim


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:00 pm 
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Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2007 9:49 am
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Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
First name: Hesh
Last Name: Breakstone
Country: United States
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Hi Bernie and welcome to the OLF!!!

Yes the stain is most likely from the CA (super glue) and is a common problem that CA users have to consider.  The fix, in the future, is to seal the area around the rosette or purfings/bindings on the top with shellac and later sand the shellac off.  What you are looking to do is seal the end grain but it helps to just paint up the entire area.

We had this question a few weeks ago and the best answer then was to just coat the entire top with CA.  Be sure to do this in a very well ventilated area, a respirator would be a good idea as would eye protection.

Attempting to stain it will likely just recolor the problem and it will still be there.





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:02 pm 
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Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
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I'll add since I tend to be a nag at times....... that good old Titebond won't stain your top.  I use Titebond for rosettes, purfings, and bindings.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:11 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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Hesh, do you use titebond for abalone rosettes?

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Ken H


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:20 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

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Location: Cape Verde
[QUOTE=Hesh]I'll add since I tend to be a nag at times....... that good old Titebond won't stain your top.  I use Titebond for rosettes, purfings, and bindings. [/QUOTE]


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:24 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

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Location: Cape Verde

Hi Hesh,


Thanks for the prompt reply.  I'm coming around to your way of thinking.  I used titebond on previous rosettes but his one was segmented snake wood and was difficult to bond. In the end the CA with a shot of accelerator was my quick fix.  I think the yellowing might be hidden by the strings for the most part.  In the future I will seal the top with shellac before inserting the rosette!


Happy New Year!


Bernie



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:29 pm 
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Walnut
Walnut

Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:33 am
Posts: 4
Location: Cape Verde

[QUOTE=larkim]Hi Bernie,

Welcome to the OLF

Not much you can do to remove CA from spruce I'm afraid and I think your on the right track in seeking a way to try and mask it. As for stains in shellac, I will let someone else more experienced to tackle but one think to keep in mind for the next one is to always seal the rosette rebate or any other end-grain on spruce with shellac to stop the CA from wicking in.

Cheers

Kim[/QUOTE]


THanks Kim.  You are of course completely correct.  I should have sealed the area.  I used Titebond on previous rosettes but this time was inserting segmented snakewood and it was not bonding well. Hence the CA.


I'm hoping the slight yellowing will be less visible over time as the french polish finish darkens.


All the best for the New Year!


Bernie



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:29 pm 
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Koa
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Location: United States
I do not use CA on spruce. I use duco cement for the plastic rosette material and tite bond or elmers for wood and wood fiber. Pearl is also done with tite bond. You will look at the CA stain forever . You can tell people your dog did it .
    I don't really see any advantage for CA on a rosette. Duco cement is ready to work down in an hour . Tite bond , same thing.
   john hall
blues creek guitars


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:33 pm 
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Contributing Member
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 1:43 am
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Location: Morral, OH
Sun-Burst it.

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tim...
http://www.mcknightguitars.com


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:40 pm 
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Old Growth Brazilian Rosewood
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Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
First name: Hesh
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I don't work with pearl much but I have and I used Titebond there too.

I do this thing where after gluing my rosette, with Titebond, I run it through the thickness sander "lightly" about 25 minutes after weighting it all down/clamping.  Some of the Titebond is still not cured and any gaps that I have get filled with dust that is mashed into the soft Titebond.

The next day I run it through my thickness sander again when everything is cured.

The result - gapless rosettes every time.



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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:42 pm 
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Brazilian Rosewood
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 10:11 am
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Location: Tampa Bay
First name: Dave
Last Name: Anderson
City: Clearwater
State: Florida
Zip/Postal Code: 33755
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I did this on one of my rosettes but I had sealed it with shellac.Maybe not good enough.Anyway,It is not visible now that the guitar is finished.

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Anderson Guitars
Clearwater,Fl. 33755


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:35 am 
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Old Growth Brazilian
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Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2004 1:56 am
Posts: 10707
Location: United States
As others have said CA stains can not be removed, and that is why those of us that use it sel the end grain with shellac first.. sorry for the bad news.

Like Tim said burst the top. Maybe a deep amber fadding into natural.


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