Official Luthiers Forum!

Solely owned and operated by Lance Kragenbrink
It is currently Sat Sep 22, 2018 7:22 pm


All times are UTC - 5 hours


Forum rules


Be nice, no cussin and enjoy!




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 11:39 am 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member

Joined: Fri May 09, 2008 2:25 pm
Posts: 1748
First name: George
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
I imagine many of you received the recent email newsletter from Stew-Mac with a link to a video demonstrating a jig that allows a table saw to create a curved truss rod channel. While I applaud the ingenuity, I'm left wondering how I missed any past references to the need for such a procedure. Is this just for repairing old Gibsons? More to the point, are you putting a curve in your truss rod slots? If so, why?

Here's a link to the demonstration: https://youtu.be/9Okx5YLePPs

Curious,

_________________
George :-)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:03 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 4:15 pm
Posts: 1598
First name: Joey
Last Name: Holliday
City: Pamplin
State: Virginia
Zip/Postal Code: 23958
Country: United States
Focus: Build
Status: Semi-pro
I saw that too and wondered the same. I took it as this method was to restore an old Gibson because it was a single action truss rod with the back bow created by the curved slot being the other action? Hopefully someone else chimes in as I was curious as to why one would do this as well.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:36 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 9:59 pm
Posts: 2907
First name: Dennis
Last Name: Kincheloe
City: Kansas City
State: MO
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
A single action truss rod is like a giant string. When you put tension on it, it tries to pull into a straight line, and likes to vibrate and rattle against the walls of the channel. If the channel is curved, then when the rod tries to pull into a straight line, it pulls against the convex wall of the channel and isn't able to vibrate.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:38 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 2:35 pm
Posts: 2647
Location: United States
First name: Joe
Last Name: Beaver
City: Lake Forest
State: California
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Must be for single action rods. On a double action maybe a sloped channel if you adjust thru the soundhole And you want the nut further from the soundboard, but Can't using a curved channel for double action

_________________
Joe Beaver
Maker of Sawdust


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 3:05 pm 
Offline
Koa
Koa

Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2005 4:02 am
Posts: 1826
Location: The Woodlands, Texas
First name: Barry
Last Name: Daniels
I use single action rods in a curved channel. Nice and light. The curve sort of concentrates the relief adjustment to the nut end of the rod where it is most beneficial.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:45 pm 
Offline
Contributing Member
Contributing Member

Joined: Fri May 09, 2008 2:25 pm
Posts: 1748
First name: George
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: USA
Focus: Build
Status: Amateur
Interesting. I've always used two-way truss rods. Good to know that I'll need to look into a different approach for cutting the channel, should I ever decide to use a single action rod.

_________________
George :-)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 4:43 pm 
Offline
Koa
Koa
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2005 10:11 am
Posts: 1361
Gibson and Bennedetto do (did?) it this way.

It is simple, effective and the lightest of the adjustable rods....

I use this type on my archtops


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:35 pm 
Offline
Brazilian Rosewood
Brazilian Rosewood

Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:21 am
Posts: 3827
Location: Central PA
First name: john
Last Name: hall
City: Hegins
State: pa
Zip/Postal Code: 17938
Country: usa
Focus: Build
Status: Professional
not all truss rods work on the same principal. You have 2 different methods of controlling neck relief
A flixible truss rods
Martin , uses this style and all 2 way rods do this. The neck is flexed by a mechanical means not tension

Note:
As you adjust the rod the rod flexes and pushes on the neck one way or the other. So in a way this is a mechanical rod

B compressible rods
Gibson used this as did other manufactures. A simple long threaded rod with a fixed end on one end. A fixed point at the adjuster end. As you tightened the rod the neck flexes under tension. To make this a 2 way rod you simply adjust tension on the neck flatten it then glue on the fretboard. This allows you forward and backward adjustment.
Wayne Henderson uses this method but his barrel nut is inside the guitar.
Gibson has the ugly head stock cover on the head plate

_________________
John Hall
blues creek guitars
Authorized CF Martin Repair
Member Board of Directors ASIA
You Don't know what you don't know until you know it


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Glen H and 11 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
phpBB customization services by 2by2host.com